ARC Sports & Musculoskeletal Medicine

Keeping you on top of your game

Sports Medicine treatment and injury prevention

If you have an injury while playing sports, exercising, or doing any physical activity, a primary care sports medicine specialist can diagnose and develop a treatment plan for your recovery. Your visit may include x-rays or a referral for advanced imaging (MRI, CT, etc.), depending on the severity of the injury.

A sports medicine specialist is highly trained in the non-operative treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. Most sports injuries don’t require surgery, but if a surgery evaluation is needed, your doctor will coordinate your care with an orthopedic surgeon.

Non-surgical treatment for sports-related injuries

Ninety percent of sports injuries do not need surgery and can be treated with over-the-counter pain relievers, ice to reduce swelling, and a cast or sling to immobilize the joint. Most patients will see a sports medicine doctor for acute and overuse injuries or injection therapies. Common issues include knee, shoulder, leg or hip injuries, pulled or sprained muscles, joint pain, or pain from osteoarthritis. If additional care is needed, you will be referred to physical and occupational therapies or to an orthopedic sports medicine surgeon if surgery is a better treatment option.

Services

Bracing

Bracing

Bracing restricts movement and can help relieve pressure, help heal, take weight off an injured area, and provide post-operative support.

Casting

Casting

Casting helps immobilize injured bones, promote healing, and reduce pain and swelling while bones heal from surgery or injury.

X-Ray

X-Ray

Standard x-rays are done for many reasons. These reasons include diagnosing tumors, bone injuries, and other reasons for spine pain.

Conditions

Ankle Sprains

Ankle Sprains

An ankle sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. It occurs when your foot turns in on itself, stretching and weakening the ligaments that bridge the ankle and foot bones.

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Concussion

Concussion

A concussion is a blow or a jolt to the head can cause a concussion or traumatic brain injury (TBI). An injury to another part of the body that transmits force to the head can also result in concussion. The injury may keep the brain from working normally. Symptoms of a concussion may last less than a day or may linger for months, or longer. Symptoms include headache, vomiting or nausea, trouble thinking normally, memory problems, or trouble walking.

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Fractures

Fractures

A fracture is a partial or complete break in the bone, caused by falls, injury, or as a result of a direct hit or kick to the body. Fractures most often happen when more force is applied to the bone than the bone can take.

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Joint Pain

Joint Pain

Many hip and knee problems are a result of the aging process and continual wear and stress on the knee or hip joint (such as arthritis). Osteoarthritis the most common type of arthritis, and is a degenerative process where the cartilage in the joint gradually wears away.

Knee Injuries

Knee Injuries

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Muscle Strains

Muscle Strains

Muscle strains, also known as a pulled muscle, can cause pain, swelling, muscle spasms, and limit the ability to move the muscle.

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis. It's a long-term (chronic) degenerative joint disease.

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Rotator Cuff Tear

Rotator Cuff Tear

The rotator cuff is made up of muscles and tendons that hold the shoulder in place, that allows you to lift your arm and reach up. A rotator cuff tear involves 1 or more rotator cuff tendons becoming inflamed and torn from overuse, aging, a fall on an outstretched hand, or a collision.

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Shoulder Injuries

Shoulder Injuries

Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone caused by heavy repetitive movements like jumping or running. Conditions such as osteoporosis can also play a factor in developing stress fractures.

Tendonitis

Tendonitis

Tendonitis is inflammation of the tendon, a flexible band of tissue that connects muscle to bones, and is often due to an overuse injury in the affected area from repetitive motion.

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Locations & Providers

  • ARC Cedar Park Building B
    801 East Whitestone Blvd Building B
    Cedar Park, TX 78613
    Get Directions
    • Brandon K. Zinn, DO, MPH
      Brandon K. Zinn, DO, MPH
      Sports & Musculoskeletal Medicine
      4.8

      Accepting new patients Languages: Spanish

  • ARC Kelly Lane
    2100 Autumn Slate Drive Suite 150
    Pflugerville, TX 78660
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    • Jerett A. Zipin, DO
      Jerett A. Zipin, DO
      Sports & Musculoskeletal Medicine
      4.8

      Accepting new patients

  • ARC Kyle Plum Creek
    4100 Everett Street Suite 400
    Kyle, TX 78640
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    • Ross E. Hairgrove, MD
      Ross E. Hairgrove, MD
      Sports & Musculoskeletal Medicine
      4.6

      Accepting new patients

  • ARC Medical Park Tower Orthopedics
    1301 West 38th Street Suite 102
    Austin, TX 78705
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    • Jason B. Holinbeck, MD
      Jason B. Holinbeck, MD
      Sports & Musculoskeletal Medicine
      4.8

      Accepting new patients

  • ARC Round Rock
    940 Hesters Crossing Road
    Round Rock, TX 78681
    Get Directions
    • Brandon K. Zinn, DO, MPH
      Brandon K. Zinn, DO, MPH
      Sports & Musculoskeletal Medicine
      4.8

      Accepting new patients Languages: Spanish

    • Jerett A. Zipin, DO
      Jerett A. Zipin, DO
      Sports & Musculoskeletal Medicine
      4.8

      Accepting new patients

  • ARC South 1st
    3828 South 1st Street
    Austin, TX 78704
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    • Jason B. Holinbeck, MD
      Jason B. Holinbeck, MD
      Sports & Musculoskeletal Medicine
      4.8

      Accepting new patients

Resources