ARC Neurology

Book Now

Neurological care and treatment

A neurologist is a medical doctor who diagnoses, treats, and manages disorders of the brain and nervous system (brain, spinal cord, and nerves). A neurologist knows the anatomy, function, and conditions that affect your nerves and nervous system.

ARC neurologists treat a myriad of neurologic conditions, including stroke, seizures, movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, autoimmune neurologic disorders such as multiple sclerosis, headache disorders like migraines, and dementias such as Alzheimer's disease.

Neurological diagnoses

As a specialist, a neurologist sees patients with a wide range of problems and may act as a patient's principal or consulting healthcare provider, working as a team with your primary care physician.

At ARC, we provide the most up-to-date neurological diagnosis and treatment options available. During your visit, your neurologist will ask about your medical history, family history, medication history, and any current symptoms. They’ll also conduct a neurologic examination and order tests to help understand the condition's severity.

Services

Electromyography (EMG)

Electromyography (EMG)

Electromyography (EMG) measures muscle response or electrical activity in response to a nerve’s stimulation of your muscle. The test is used to help find nerve and muscle problems.

Stroke Prevention

Stroke Prevention

A stroke, or brain attack, happens when blood flow to your brain is stopped. It's an emergency situation. Stroke symptoms may happen suddenly and each person’s symptoms may vary. Symptoms may include weakness, drooping, or numbness of the face, arm, or leg, usually on one side of the body, having trouble reading, speaking or understanding, problems with vision, such as dimness or loss of vision in one or both eyes, dizziness or problems with balance or coordination.

Conditions

Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer disease is a disease that affects the brain and nervous system and happens when nerve cells in the brain die. The disease gets worse over time and is a type of dementia. Alzheimer disease often causes problems with memory, thinking, and behavior, confusion, restlessness, personality changes, problems with judgment, problems with making sense when talking, lack of interest or concern about other people.

Learn More

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease)

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease)

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal type of motor neuron disease that causes progressive degeneration of nerve cells in the spinal cord and brain. It's often called Lou Gehrig disease after a famous baseball player who died from the disease. With ALS, you may first have weakness in a limb that occurs over a few days or, more often, a few weeks. Then a few weeks or months later, weakness develops in another limb. For other people, the first sign of a problem may be slurred speech or trouble swallowing.

Learn More

Bell’s Palsy

Bell’s Palsy

Bell palsy is an unexplained episode of facial muscle weakness or paralysis. It begins suddenly and can get worse over 48 hours. This condition results from damage to the facial nerve (the 7th cranial nerve). Pain and discomfort usually occur on one side of the face or head. Bell palsy can affect anyone at any age. It occurs most often in pregnant women, and in people who have diabetes, influenza, a cold, or another upper respiratory ailment. Bell palsy affects men and woman equally, and is not considered permanent. But in rare cases, it doesn't disappear.

Learn More

Blackouts and Seizures

Blackouts and Seizures

A seizure occurs when 1 or more parts of the brain has a burst of abnormal electrical signals that interrupt normal brain signals. Anything that interrupts the normal connections between nerve cells in the brain can cause a seizure. This includes a high fever, high or low blood sugar, alcohol or illegal drug withdrawal, or a brain concussion.

Learn More

Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

A tumor forms when an abnormal cell grows to form a mass or lump of abnormal cells. Spinal cord tumors are tumors that form in the spinal cord or the area around it. Spinal cord tumors are rare, brain tumors are much more common. A spinal cord tumor may form inside the spinal cord itself. Or it may form around the bones that make up the spine. Spinal cord tumors can cause problems with the nearby nerves, blood vessels, and bones.

Learn More

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is when the median nerve is squeezed (compressed) as it passes through the carpal tunnel. If it gets compressed or irritated, you may have symptoms, which include weakness when gripping objects with one or both hands or pain or numbness in one or both hands.

Learn More

Concussion

Concussion

A concussion is a blow or a jolt to the head can cause a concussion or traumatic brain injury (TBI). An injury to another part of the body that transmits force to the head can also result in concussion. The injury may keep the brain from working normally. Symptoms of a concussion may last less than a day or may linger for months, or longer. Symptoms include headache, vomiting or nausea, trouble thinking normally, memory problems, or trouble walking.

Learn More

Confusion

Confusion

Dizziness

Dizziness

Epilepsy

Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a seizure disorder that affects thousands of adults and children. A seizure is when the brain has a burst of abnormal electrical signals over a short period of time. These signals cause the body and brain to react in certain ways.

Learn More

Headaches Including Migraine

Headaches Including Migraine

A migraine headache is a throbbing type of headache is different from other types of headaches. Symptoms other than pain can occur with a migraine headache. Nausea and vomiting, lightheadedness, sensitivity to light (photophobia), and other visual changes are common. A migraine headache may last from 4 to 72 hours.

Learn More

Incoordination of Limbs

Incoordination of Limbs

Memory Loss

Memory Loss

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a long-lasting (chronic) disease of the central nervous system. It is thought to be an autoimmune disorder, a condition in which the body attacks itself by mistake. Some people with MS may have only mild symptoms. Others may lose their ability to see clearly, write, speak, or walk when communication between the brain and other parts of the body becomes disrupted.

Learn More

Muscular Dystrophy

Muscular Dystrophy

Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited diseases that causes weakness and wasting away of muscle tissue. They can also cause the breakdown of nerve tissue. There are multiple types of muscular dystrophy. Each type leads to loss of strength, increasing disability, and possible deformity.

Learn More

Myasthenia Gravis

Myasthenia Gravis

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a chronic autoimmune disorder in which the body attacks its own neuromuscular connections. This causes problems with communication between nerves and muscle, resulting in weakness. MG affects the voluntary muscles of the body, especially the eyes, mouth, throat, and limbs.

Learn More

Numbness and Tingling

Numbness and Tingling

Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson disease (also called PD or Parkinson) is the most common form of Parkinsonism, a group of motor system disorders. Parkinson often causes these symptoms: tremor or trembling of the arms, jaw, legs, and face, stiffness or rigidity of the limbs and trunk, slowness of movement (bradykinesia), or problems with balance and coordination.

Learn More

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy is a type of damage to the peripheral nervous system. This is the network of nerves that sends information from your brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) to the rest of your body. Peripheral nerves are the nerves that exit the spinal canal or skull and go to your face, trunk, or arms and legs.

Learn More

Restless Leg Syndrome

Restless Leg Syndrome

Restless legs syndrome is a disorder that affects the nervous system and muscles that causes unpleasant sensations in the legs. The sensations are described as: creeping, crawling, tingling, and pulling.

Learn More

Seizures

Seizures

A seizure occurs when 1 or more parts of the brain has a burst of abnormal electrical signals that interrupt normal brain signals. Anything that interrupts the normal connections between nerve cells in the brain can cause a seizure. This includes a high fever, high or low blood sugar, alcohol or illegal drug withdrawal, or a brain concussion.

Learn More

Stroke

Stroke

A stroke, or brain attack, happens when blood flow to your brain is stopped.

Learn More

Weakness and Paralysis of Limbs

Weakness and Paralysis of Limbs

Locations & Providers

  • ARC East 7th
    2785 East 7th Street
    Austin, TX 78702
    Get Directions
    • Scott A. Boruchow, MD
      Scott A. Boruchow, MD
      Neurology
      4.8

      Accepting new patients

    • Patrick C. Nolan, MD, PhD
      Patrick C. Nolan, MD, PhD
      Neurology
      4.8

      Accepting new patients

Resources

Additional Resources