ARC Gastroenterology

Love your guts

Book Now

Gastrointestinal care and treatment

Gastroenterologists are specialists in the disorders and diseases that affect the digestive system — which includes the gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, rectum, and anus) as well as the pancreas, liver, bile ducts, and gallbladder.

ARC gastroenterologists also perform screenings for colorectal cancer and other health issues, including performing upper endoscopy and colonoscopy.

Finding the right treatment for your G.I. tract

Persistent or regular symptoms of abdominal discomfort or heartburn aren’t normal and can indicate a more serious condition.

Some of these serious, long-term conditions might include celiac disease, diverticulitis, diverticulosis, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), or inflammatory bowel disease. A consultation with an ARC gastroenterologist can help to diagnose your symptoms and develop a treatment plan to improve your gut health.

Services

Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy

A colonoscopy is a safe and effective way to test for cancer in the colon or rectum (colorectal cancer). A colon cancer screening is typically a 20-30 minute outpatient procedure performed at a hospital or surgery center.

Learn More

Colorectal Cancer Education, Prevention, Screening, and Treatment

Colorectal Cancer Education, Prevention, Screening, and Treatment

Screening tests for Colorectal Cancer, as well as methods to try to prevent it. In addition to regular colorectal cancer screenings, exercise and maintaining a healthy weight can reduce your risk of colorectal cancer.

Diet Review, Education, Modification, and Management to Relieve Symptoms of Chronic GI Conditions

Diet Review, Education, Modification, and Management to Relieve Symptoms of Chronic GI Conditions

What you eat can contribute to digestive problems. Changing your diet and lifestyle, avoiding certain foods, and managing stress may offer significant benefits.

Esophageal Dilation

Esophageal Dilation

An esophageal dilation is used to widen a narrowed section of your esophagus, relieving difficulty swallowing or dysphagia.

Financial Counseling

Financial Counseling

Gastrointestinal Symptom and Condition Evaluation and Treatment

Gastrointestinal Symptom and Condition Evaluation and Treatment

Gastroenterologists can evaluate and treat diseases that affect the digestive system, which includes the gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, rectum, and anus) as well as the pancreas, liver, bile ducts, and gallbladder.

Conditions

Abdominal Pain

Abdominal Pain

Occasional indigestion, cramping or abdominal pain, and acid reflux are normal and relatively common. Persistent or regular discomfort like this isn’t normal, however, and several conditions that start with these symptoms can become severe. Talk with a gastroenterologist who can determine whether you need medical treatment.

Abnormal Liver Tests

Abnormal Liver Tests

A series of blood tests can often find out if the liver is inflamed, injured, or working normally. These tests can also tell the difference between acute and chronic liver disorders.

Learn More

Acid Reflux

Acid Reflux

Heartburn, also called acid indigestion, or acid reflux, is a burning chest pain that starts behind your breastbone and moves up to your neck and throat. It can last as long as 2 hours. It often feels worse after you eat. Lying down or bending over can also cause heartburn.

Learn More

Barrett’s Esophagus

Barrett’s Esophagus

Barrett esophagus is when the normal cells that line your food pipe (esophagus) turn into abnormal cells not usually found in your esophagus. The abnormal cells, called specialized columnar cells or intestinal metaplasia, take over because the lining of the esophagus has been damaged.

Learn More

Celiac Disease

Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is a digestive problem that hurts your small intestine, and stops your body from taking in nutrients from food. You may have celiac disease if you are sensitive to gluten, found in wheat, rye, and barley, or sometimes found in small amounts in mixed oats. When you have celiac disease and you eat foods with gluten, you may have symptoms such as stomach pain or swelling (bloating) that keeps coming back, gas, or muscle cramps or bone pain.

Learn More

Colon Cancer Screening

Colon Cancer Screening

Colon cancer screening can help detect colon cancer early, when it’s easier to treat.

Learn More

Colon Polyps

Colon Polyps

Polyps are a small clump of cells that forms on the lining of the colon or rectum. These bumps are mostly harmless but can develop into cancer.

Learn More

Constipation

Constipation

Constipation is when your stools are painful or they don't happen often enough, and is the most common GI (gastrointestinal) problem. You may have constipation if you have bowel movements less than 3 times a week, or your stool is hard, dry, and in small pieces.

Learn More

Diarrhea

Diarrhea

Diarrhea is when your stools are loose and watery. You may also need to go to the bathroom more often. Diarrhea is a common problem. It may last 1 or 2 days and go away on its own. If it lasts more than 2 days, it may mean you have a more serious problem.

Learn More

Dysphagia

Dysphagia

Dysphagia is when something goes wrong with the muscles that direct swallowing. Dysphagia can lead to food or other material entering the airways or lungs.

Learn More

Eosinophilic Esophagitis

Eosinophilic Esophagitis

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a long-term (chronic) allergic and immune condition in the esophagus. With EoE, your immune system reacts to allergens in the esophagus. It makes and multiplies eosinophils in the esophagus and causes inflammation in the esophagus.

Learn More

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) is a digestive disorder that's caused when gastric acid from your stomach flows back up into your food pipe (esophagus). Heartburn is the most common symptom of GERD. GERD happens when gastric acid from your stomach backs up into your food pipe (esophagus).

Learn More

Gastrointestinal Blood Loss

Gastrointestinal Blood Loss

Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a symptom of a disorder in your digestive tract. The blood often appears in stool or vomit but isn't always visible, though it may cause the stool to look black or tarry.

Learn More

Gastrointestinal Malignancy

Gastrointestinal Malignancy

Colorectal cancer is the most common GI cancer that starts in either your colon or your rectum. Other types of cancer that can start in the colon or rectum are much less common Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), Lymphoma, Carcinoid, or Sarcoma

Learn More

Heartburn

Heartburn

Heartburn, also called acid indigestion, or acid reflux, is a burning chest pain that starts behind your breastbone and moves up to your neck and throat. It can last as long as 2 hours. It often feels worse after you eat. Lying down or bending over can also cause heartburn.

Learn More

Helicobacter Pylori Infection

Helicobacter Pylori Infection

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that infects your stomach. It can damage the tissue in your stomach and the first part of your small intestine (the duodenum), which can cause pain and inflammation. In some cases, it can also cause painful sores called peptic ulcers in your upper digestive tract. H. pylori is common. Most people who have it won’t get ulcers or show any symptoms, but it is a main cause of ulcers.

Learn More

Iron Deficiency Anemia

Iron Deficiency Anemia

The most common cause of anemia is a lack of iron, called iron deficiency. Iron is needed to make hemoglobin, the part of red blood cells that carries oxygen to the body. Most of your body’s iron is stored in hemoglobin. Iron-deficiency anemia may be caused by a diet low in iron, body changes, GI (gastrointestinal) tract problems, or blood loss.

Learn More

Ulcers

Ulcers

An ulcer is a sore on the lining of your stomach or the first part of your small intestine (duodenum). If the ulcer is in your stomach, it's also called a gastric ulcer. If the ulcer is in your duodenum, it's called a duodenal ulcer. Rarely, they can happen further down your intestine. Ulcers are fairly common, and caused by H. pylori bacteria (Helicobacter pylori) or NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines) - over-the-counter pain and fever medicines such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen. Long-term use can damage the mucus that protects the lining of your stomach.

Learn More

Locations & Providers

  • ARC East 7th
    2785 East 7th Street
    Austin, TX 78702
    Get Directions
    • Sami N. Adib, MD
      Sami N. Adib, MD
      Gastroenterology
      4.6

      Accepting new patients Languages: French, Arabic

    • Keri Lee T. Pinnock, MD
      Keri Lee T. Pinnock, MD
      Gastroenterology
      4.7

      Accepting new patients

  • ARC Medical Plaza Specialty
    1401 Medical Parkway Building B, Suites 200, 211 & 220
    Cedar Park, TX 78613
    Get Directions
    • Weiwei Cao, MD, PhD
      Weiwei Cao, MD, PhD
      Gastroenterology
      4.8

      Accepting new patients Languages: Mandarin Chinese

    • Maria E. Chiejina, MD
      Maria E. Chiejina, MD
      Gastroenterology
      4.7

      Accepting new patients Languages: Igbo

    • Nina Nandy, MD, MS, ABOM, FACG
      Nina Nandy, MD, MS, ABOM, FACG
      Gastroenterology
      4.8

      Accepting new patients Languages: French, Bengali

  • ARC Northwest Hills Specialty
    6818 Austin Center Blvd Suite 205
    Austin, TX 78731
    Get Directions
    • Muhannad G. Al Hanayneh, MD
      Muhannad G. Al Hanayneh, MD
      Gastroenterology
      4.7

      Accepting new patients Languages: French, Arabic

    • Yasir Al-Abboodi, MD
      Yasir Al-Abboodi, MD
      Gastroenterology
      4.6

      Accepting new patients

    • Neema M. Saraiya, MD
      Neema M. Saraiya, MD
      Gastroenterology
      4.7

      Accepting new patients Languages: Spanish

    • Enrique Spindel, MD
      Enrique Spindel, MD
      Gastroenterology

      Accepting new patients Languages: Spanish

Resources